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Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Natural Wine Tasting!


This Friday!!
Friday September 22, 2017 - 4-6pm

The Wine and Cheese Place- Forsyth
7435 Forsyth Blvd, Clayton MO

Natural and Orange Wine Tasting!
with Dana from Vinoteca

This is a rare chance to expand your horizons on Natural and Orange wine.  This is a tasting not to miss.

Orange and Natural wines are a hot category now!
Let us know on Facebook that you are coming!

Orange/Skin-Fermented:

  • Scribe Skin-Fermented Chardonnay 2015, Sonoma 
  • Red Tail Ridge Miscreant 2015 (Gewurztraminer & Chardonnay), Finger Lakes 
  • Il Censo "Praruar" 2014 (Cattarato), Sicily

Natural:
  • Mac Forbes Chardonnay 2015, Yarra Valley 
  • Mure Pinot Gris 2015, Alsace 
  • Lunar Apoge Syrah 2016, Rhone 
  • Joan d'Anguera "Altaroses" 2015, Monsant 
  • Frederic Brouca "Samso Seulle" 2015, Languedoc
  • Cooper Hill Pinot Noir 2015, Willamette Valley
  • Castello Conti "L'Origini" 2014, Piedmont



Info from Natalie MaClean
Is Orange the New White?

  • Let’s clear this up first: orange wine is not made from oranges, it refers only to the wine’s colour ;)
  • It’s also known as amber wine and skin-fermented white wine
  • Although orange wine seems new and trendy, it’s actually an ancient style of wine that’s been used for thousands of years to make white wines, often fermented without temperature control for long periods in qvevri (clay vessels or amphorae), in regions such as Georgia and Armenia.
  • Modern white winemaking with temperature-controlled fermentation in stainless steel tanks has only been practised for the past 40-50 years.
  • The re-emergence of orange wines started in the early 1990s with Italian winemaker Josko Gravner in the northern cool region of Friuli. He was trying to get away from over-manipulated wines and get back to ancient methods.
  • Today, orange wines are produced in Europe, North America, Australia, Chile, South Africa, New Zealand.
  • Orange wines are white wines made like red wines: confused yet?
  • They start out like making white wine, but then they leave the grape skins on during fermentation just as red wines do and white wines do not.
  • This imparts distinctive colour, flavour and texture whereas the skins are removed to ferment white wine
  • orange wine is also exposed to more oxygen which adds a savoury character called umami, the fifth taste along with sweet, salty, sour and bitter
  • The VQA law specifies that the wine is a table wine (still or effervescent) made from fresh white or pink vinifera and permitted hybrid grapes.
  • All of the grapes are macerated and fermented on their skins for at least ten days to achieve the character of orange wine.
  • The words “Skin Fermented White” must be on the label and optionally “Orange” or “Amber” can also be printed. appear alongside), but the essence is that the wine must ferment on the skins.
  • Vintners must also declare their intent to make a skin-fermented white at the time of harvest, just as they must do with icewine, so they don’t claim the label after the fact because a wine doesn’t get approval for another category.
  • The skins of grapes contain aromatic precursors, the compounds that eventually get released into the wine to create its distinctive aromas and flavours, as well as polyphenols that shield wine from oxydation and thereby allow it to age longer. As a solvent, alcohol helps to extract these compounds from the skins.
  • some criticize orange wine as masking local soil and climate (terroir) as well as grape character
  • the reverse argument is that orange wine is truer to terroir because it uses all of the grape: flesh, juice and skin
  • like natural, organic and biodynamic wines, orange wines usually don’t have any additives and aren’t filtered or fined
  • However, not all natural, organic and biodynamic wines are orange
  • And not all orange wines are also natural, organic or biodynamic wines
  • You won’t find an orange wine category on most restaurant lists: they’re usually lumped into the white wine category, and sometimes rose, except of course, on the hippest lists in San Francisco, New York, Paris, Tokyo and Florence.

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